Restore the Republic

I would really like your comments on this video as well as the 2008 Presidential election in general.

9 Responses to “Restore the Republic”

  1. Thomas says:

    If you have already figured out, we here at All Things Supercinski are supporters of Ron Paul. You might think us strange for that, and if so, we have no problem with that. I’d really like to have conversation about the issues facing the US and why your candidate of choice will be the best president. So, what do you think?

  2. Jacob says:

    I think I like a lot of what I hear out of Ron Paul. However, I think his ideas and positions are too “extreme” to be accepted by the majority (i.e. what is required to win an election). I’m not saying that he’s wrong, because rarely is the majority right. I just don’t think he’s “electable.”

    With that being said I don’t necessarily know for sure who I’d vote for. I’ve given the most attention to Huckabee. I like him mostly because I believe he’s a Christian that lives out his beliefs (so I believe he is a moral man, which is hard to come by in Washington, and I trust a moral man). I’m not wild about everything he says and does, but I’m comfortable enough with him. I’m very interested to see what will happen down the stretch; perhaps at that point I will start to make conclusions.

  3. D.O. says:

    I don’t claim to be an expert by any means on all the issues facing our country or anything like that, but I can say that from what I’ve heard from each of the candidates, both Republican and Democrat, I like what Ron Paul has to say the most. (I know you knew that already, but I’m trying to help get the conversation rolling).

    He is so smart. I’m reminded of when Guliani tried to corner him on 9-11 in a recent (youtube?) debate and RP just schooled him. He is very well aware of the issues facing our nation, and not only that, he knows the reasons behind them. He sees the root of so many of the problems (spending, taxes, war, security).

    Also, he is arguably one of the most consistent and has the highest integrity of anyone in our government today. I like him. Yes I do.

  4. Thomas says:

    I’m not convinced that voting for someone solely on the basis of their moral and ‘Christian’ credentials is really the best way to look at it.

    While a great deal of what our country and world are going through are certainly out of the control of the current occupant, I think anyone would be hard-pressed to say President Bush has done an excellent job. He promised a lot to Conservative Christians, that in my opinion, was just pandering for votes. The record shows that those priorities were not priorities for the administration at all, from day one.

    I don’t believe Huckabee has the policy positions the US needs now, nor does he have the experience to be a part of the international stage. I think his record in Arkansas shows he is not much different than a traditional tax and spend Democrat.

    Finally, Jacob, I think you will be interested in this article, which talks about what I think is a fatal flaw of Huckabee’s approach to government.

    I’m pretty dogmatic about my choice, but I have certainly been wrong in the past and will likely be wrong again, so I can be convinced otherwise.

  5. Jacob says:

    All I was trying to say with the Christianity comment was that I feel I (and others) can trust him. The only other two that I think would come close to earning my trust would be Ron Paul and Duncan Hunter. I’m not talking credentials, I’m just talking trust.

  6. Thomas says:

    For me both trust and credibility are inextricably linked . As you are well aware, just because someone says they are a Christian doesn’t mean you can necessarily trust them.

  7. seth j. says:

    I’m no where near as educated on all of the presidential hopefuls but from the small amount of reading/listening/watching of the candidates I am heavily leaning towards Ron Paul. It seems the more I read about him the more I realize that I agree with his logic and position. There are definitely a few points that I am not in total agreement on but those are FAR outweighed by those I do agree with.

    One of the things that I do truly enjoy about him is the consistency that I see in him. His past congressional voting keeps in track with his current thoughts on Government and Policy. There doesn’t seem to be much wavering to fit the current political climate or jumping on the same bandwagon as other political leaders. Ron Paul sticks to his beliefs whether popular or not and I believe if he is elected into office he will continue to make decisions consistent to the character he has shown thus far, and that is what we need. We need someone who, once in office, will not succumb to the inevitable political pressures.

  8. Andy says:

    Not that I know for a fact that the quotes are accurate, but are you familiar with the newsletter he ran in the 90’s? I recently saw an article with some really racist remarks attributed to him, as well as a general strong judgment on other people. Have you heard if they are genuine or fake?

  9. Rhylan says:

    The newsletter was real, and the quotes are accurate in that they came from the newsletter, but Paul didn’t write them and wasn’t actively editing the newsletter.

    I *think* his first statement on the matter was in 1996 when it was raised during a House campaign, and Paul stated what I just said – he didn’t write them, wasn’t editing his own newsletter, it was a mistake to allow other people to put out literature under his name and he put a stop to it, etc. The few times I’ve seen him asked about it recently, he’s called it old news and says his previous statements tell the story.

    I just started “Pillars of Prosperity,” a collection of RP letters to the House of Representatives going back to the late ’70s. It’s available on http://www.mises.org. It’s amazing to see the consistency. One thing I do notice is his tendency to exaggerate the coming economic doomsday (in 1984 he said it would be the 1990s, and so on), but it’s difficult to argue against the economic theory behind his assumptions.